When should you act as the jury?

When should you act as the jury?

Never. Because, as this real-life example illustrates, most judgments don't involve open-and-shut cases.
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Mar 01, 2009

Every practice has one—or two, or three, or four: A client who just doesn't get it. This type of pet owner declines recommendations for flea and tick preventives because the dog only goes outside to go to the bathroom. Judging clients like this seems straightforward—but it isn't. Take this true case:

A client brought in her dog that had been holding its eye shut for two to three weeks. The client didn't realize this almost always indicates pain. It would've been easy for the clinic team to say, "How could she be so stupid, leaving her poor dog in pain for so long?" Instead, they accepted the possibility that they hadn't properly educated this client about how animals express pain.

Who should be blamed in this situation? No one. The client and veterinary team both learned a valuable lesson and they'll all be better off because of it. The next time you and your team members feel the urge to judge, resist it. Then turn the spotlight on yourselves to see if there's room for improvement.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.