Our client is obsessed with tests

Our client is obsessed with tests

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May 01, 2008

Q. How should we handle a client who seems obsessed with repeating diagnostic tests?


Jim Kramer
Your medical team should decide what diagnostic tests are appropriate, says Jim Kramer, DVM, CVPM, a partner at Columbus Animal Hospital in Columbus, Neb. If a client's persistent, consider why she may not trust your care. Was she shuffled between doctors or given conflicting advice? Has the patient failed to improve or improved only to relapse?

"One of our clients recently requested repeated tests when we thought it may be unnecessary. But it turned out the client detected a problem we failed to find in physical exams and previous diagnostic tests," Dr. Kramer says. "Remember, clients know their animals best."

So start with a thorough history and consider additional diagnostics or referring the client to a board certified specialist, Dr. Kramer says. "Always make sure your decisions are rooted in the best medicine and accepted practices," he says. "And in case the situation escalates to litigation or a licensure complaint, document everything as if the licensing board might investigate."

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

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An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.