"He never eats scraps" (And other lies clients tell)

"He never eats scraps" (And other lies clients tell)

Why do clients pretend they gave medication, swear their pup stays on a leash, or claim their cat never goes outside? Let's look at what's beneath these fibs and examine how we can inject a little truth serum into our conversations with clients.
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May 01, 2008


Illustration by Jennifer Taylor
Every day clients lie. In fact, 99 percent of team members say clients have lied to them, according to a 2007 VetMedTeam.com survey. Sometimes it's a nuisance, often it's humorous, and occasionally it's nearly fatal.

So what do clients lie about? Their ability to pay for services and what they feed their pets top the list, according to the survey. Other lies include what they were told by another veterinary practice, previous care they provided for their pet, and their pet's current health and vaccination status.


Fig. 1
White lie or big fib, it's no fun to be on the receiving end of these untruths—especially when they challenge your ability to offer the care pets need. Here's a look at why clients lie and what you can do when they let loose with the whoppers.


Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.