Keeping count of consumables

Keeping count of consumables

source-image
Apr 01, 2006

Q: How should we control our consumables, such as bandage and suture materials and other hospital supplies that we use but seldom charge for?


Mark Opperman
"Great question!" says Mark Opperman, CVPM, a practice management consultant and owner of VMC Inc. in Evergreen, Colo. One solution, he says, is the red flag inventory control system. Here's how it works: You'll label a red flag with the product's name and place the flag at the re-order point of the item you're trying to control. When you hit the red flag, you'll remove it and place it in a box or on a hook.

"Once a week the inventory manager gathers the flags, which indicate what you need to order," Opperman says. When you receive items from the vendor, write the date, amount purchased, and amount paid on the back of the flag. Then reattach the flag to the new product at the re-order point. "This approach helps you to control your inventory and tells you the shelf life of the product and whether there's been a price increase," he says.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.