Explain the signs of heat exhaustion to clients

Explain the signs of heat exhaustion to clients

When the temperatures rise, tragedy can strike. Be sure clients know the dangers of leaving pets in the heat.
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Jul 02, 2012
By dvm360.com staff

This summer is just beginning and its already been a dangerously hot one. Two dogs left in a pickup truck in western Massachusetts have died. Dr. Erika Mueller says one of the dogs was already dead when the owner took them to the South Deerfield Emergency Veterinary Hospital, and the other dog died shortly after arrival. According to the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Mueller, the hospital's co-owner, said the well-meaning dog owner left the animals in the truck with a window open and a supply of water, but the temperatures soared into the 90s, which means it can get higher than 100 in a vehicle.

Don't let this tragedy happen to your veterinary patients. Make sure clients are aware of the dangers of leaving pets in the car on a summer day—even if it's just for a minute. Also educate clients about the signs of heat stroke in pets. If clients observe any of these behaviors in their pets, they should call your clinic immediately:

  • Panting
  • Salivating
  • Lethargic behavior
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Seizures