Working with clients - technicians | Firstline

Working with clients - technicians

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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Sep 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
Your veterinarian has determined that your dog has allergies to certain substances, such as house dust mites and various grasses and insects, and may benefit from allergen injections to slowly lessen your pet's reaction to the substances. You can easily administer these injections at home.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2006
Give the last clients of the day the same warm reception the 40 clients in front of them enjoyed.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2006
Step back—so you can put your best foot forward
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff
After researching your customers, you'll be ready to set a marketing plan that fits your practice's needs
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jul 01, 2006
These three types of questions help you start the discussion—and keep it going.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: May 01, 2006
Difficult clients do your practice more harm than good by damaging team morale and causing conflict. Figure out who they are, and let them go.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Apr 01, 2006
We have a sign out front that we put messages and sayings on. But we struggle to come up with something to put on it. Any suggestions?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Feb 01, 2006
Consider starting annual, seasonal, or quarterly events to expand your client base and retain current clients. Be creative: Make your promotions fun; make them silly!
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Clients judge the quality and value your practice offers during the first three minutes of contact.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
A++ clients make appointments the day they get your postcard, call, or e-mail. Here's how to help the others make the grade.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Ever wonder what surgery is like from the pet's perspective? Your clients do.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2005
Even veterinary teams sometimes overlook the power of the love and support pets provide. But now and then you may get an important reminder that a pet can lend hope and support healing--just as this veterinary student did.
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VETERINARY MEDICINE: Nov 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
The failure to thrive in newborn puppies and kittens, or neonates, is known as fading puppy and kitten syndrome. The syndrome can occur from birth to 9 weeks of age. Affected neonates can decline quickly and die, so immediate detection and treatment are key to survival. Be sure you know what to look for and what to do if you see any warning signs.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff
In 23 percent of practices, credentialed technicians are responsible for most of the client's education, according to a recent survey by VetMedTeam.com. In 52 percent of practices, veterinarians handle the bulk of education, while in 19 percent of practices, veterinary assistants take charge of this task. Here's a look at the percentage of respondents who say team members discuss these issues with clients:
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
It only takes a little extra effort to make pet owners feel special. The benefit: happy, loyal clients who appreciate your care.