Which shift gets the short end of the stick?

Which shift gets the short end of the stick?

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Apr 28, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

It's as if a scary movie comes to life. A decent human by day turns into a monster by night. No, we're not talking about werewolves but, rather, your boss. According to a nationwide survey, evening workers are more likely to witness their boss's transformation from Dr. Jekyll to the evil Mr. Hyde.

The phone survey of 1,000 adults found that 41 percent of those who pull the night shift said their bosses never provide acknowledgment of hard work or success. And 25 percent of night-shift people reported their bosses don't provide guidance or advancement opportunities. Meanwhile, 38 percent of late workers said their bosses frequently steal credit versus 21 percent of daytime workers who said the same thing.

The study, conducted in May 2008, didn't delve into why evening workers were more prone to rate their supervisors as bad bosses. But if you're burning the midnight oil at a 24-hour clinic and need some advice, try this: How to tame beastly bosses.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

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The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

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A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

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An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

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Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.