What do clients want?

What do clients want?

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Aug 01, 2007


The 411
Unfortunately, you can't read clients' minds and predict the information, products, and services they want. But you can take a good guess through a revolutionary process called listening.

Nancy Allen, a Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member and the practice manager at Olathe Animal Hospital in Olathe, Kan., says most clients will give you clues about what they want. Sometimes, it's the team members who mix up the message because they're so focused on their education agenda that they forget to listen.

The solution: Start focusing your attention during these important conversations. If you feel like clients speak a different language, rehearse listening exercises at team meetings, says Sharon DeNayer, a Firstline board member and the practice manager at Windsor Veterinary Clinic in Windsor, Colo. "Practice asking direct, pointed questions to elicit the information you need," DeNayer says.

Office visits are simply conversations between people who love animals. When you really listen, you're able to provide better client and patient care.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.