Veterinary technicians | Firstline

Patient care for techs

Why Fear Free veterinary visits make your team happier

FIRSTLINE - Jan 23, 2015

Pets can—and should—be happy to see you at the clinic.

Fear Free veterinary tip: Teach fraidy cats to love their carriers

FIRSTLINE - Jan 07, 2015

No animal should live their life in fear—especially when it comes to normal life events, such as going to the veterinarian.

Fear Free tip: Embrace muzzle training

FIRSTLINE - Dec 01, 2014

For dogs that may show signs of aggression, pretraining them to a muzzle can reduce their stress during a veterinary visit.

Fear Free tip: Getting a pet to the veterinarian

FIRSTLINE - Oct 01, 2014

Teach pet owners to choose the right crate and prepare their pets to travel

Vet tech's confession: "I was bitten"

FIRSTLINE - Jul 31, 2014

A cat bite took me by surprise—and taught me some important lessons.

Client service for techs

Why Fear Free veterinary visits make your team happier

FIRSTLINE - Jan 23, 2015

Pets can—and should—be happy to see you at the clinic.

The wrong language can alienate veterinary clients

VETERINARY ECONOMICS - Jan 16, 2015

Don’t turn clients off—use these expert tips to perfect a positive approach during pet examinations.

A calamity of blood work errors

FIRSTLINE - Jan 12, 2015

A series of unfortunate events showed me how pet owners play a critical role in accurate blood work.

The heartworm toolkit

dvm360.com - Jan 06, 2015

This toolkit delivers team training, free client handouts, exam room education strategies and more, all designed to make it as easy as possible for veterinarians and their teams to discuss heartworm disease with clients and promote year-round prevention in dogs and cats. (With an educational grant provided by Merck Animal Health)

Free veterinary team training on preventing pet bites

FIRSTLINE - Dec 22, 2014

New from Firstline, we're happy to present our latest Team Meeting in a Box: Armor your team to prevent pet bites

Proceedings papers for techs

Restraint, physical examination and venipuncture techniques in small mammals (Proceedings)

CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS - Aug 01, 2011

The exotic small mammal physical examination is performed similarly to other small animals such as dogs and cats. All items that may be needed during the physical examination should be out and within hands reach before you start. Exotic small mammals can become easily stressed so it is essential to keep the "time in hand" to a minimum when necessary.

Managing fractious cats (Proceedings)

CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS - Aug 01, 2011

Fractious cats are an inevitable part of small animal practice. A client's decision to return to your hospital for future veterinary services may hinge on how the doctor and staff deal with these patients. In fact, your level of achievement in the "art of practice" is seen vividly in your ability to deal with these difficult patients.

Anesthesia for small exotic mammals (Proceedings)

CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS - Aug 01, 2011

Exotic small mammals (formally known as pocket pets) are challenging creatures to work with. When working with dogs and cats, it is usually easy to place an intravenous catheter, intubate, provide fluid therapy, hook up an ECG, place a blood pressure cuff, and keep track of the core body temperature.

The ABC's of dental disease in rabbits, guinea pigs, and chinchillas (Proceedings)

CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS - Aug 01, 2011

Dental disease is a generic term used for exotic small mammals such as rabbits, chinchillas and guinea pigs who have acute or chronic abnormalities and overgrowth of the teeth, usually causing medical problems such as pain, anorexia, drooling, and ocular and/or nasal discharge to just name a few.

Communicating with clients—they really don't know squat about taking care of their pets (Proceedings)

CVC IN KANSAS CITY PROCEEDINGS - Aug 01, 2011

Veterinarians and their team members have been working for years to educate pet owners about the care their pets need in order for them to stay happy and healthy. Undoubtedly we've made some progress, but results from the recently released Bayer Veterinary Care Usage Study indicate we have a long way to go; many pet owners simply don't understand the need for what is generally accepted as routine care.