Veterinary managers: How to handle backlash from a no-gossip policy

Veterinary managers: How to handle backlash from a no-gossip policy

In order for a no-gossip policy to work, you must prepare employees to handle confrontation. Here’s your script to do just that.
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Jan 01, 2011

As a veterinary manager, it’s your duty to protect the team members who report policy violations. Unless they’ve specifically given you their permission to disclose their name, you must respect their anonymity. But, even then, policy offenders can often put two-and-two together and figure out who “told” on them. For these instances, it’s important to prepare those who reported the violations for confrontation. Do so by role-playing possible scenarios like the below.

Mary: “Beth, was it you who reported me to (the manager)? I got written up for that you know.”

Beth: “Yes Mary. It was me. I wanted (or tried) to speak to you about it but I was afraid you wouldn’t listen. I didn’t do it to hurt you but I feel the gossip policy is important and want to do my part to see that it is carried out.”

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