Top tips for smoothing out your schedule

Top tips for smoothing out your schedule

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Feb 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Many veterinary practices struggle to find the right number of team members for a given day. Employees are either bored to tears while waiting for the next client or frantically trying to keep up with their duties on a busy day. Some days, it's a combination of both.

But before you tinker with your employee schedule, take a look at your appointment book, says Phil Seibert, CVT, consultant with SafetyVet in Calhoun, Tenn. Many practices allow either too much or too little time for appointments, leaving the practice either understaffed or overstaffed. Measure the average length of time a typical appointment takes from start to finish—and remember that the number will be different for each veterinarian. Once you have a handle on how long each appointment will take, you can more effectively schedule the correct number of team members.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.