Technicians sit for first pain certification exam

Technicians sit for first pain certification exam

source-image
Aug 30, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

Seven credentialed technicians—and 27 veterinarians—qualified for the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management’s (IVAPM) first certification examination, which took place Aug. 29, at the CVC in Kansas City, Mo. The technicians’ experience was varied, with credentials ranging from veterinary technician specialists, general practice technicians, and technicians focused on acupuncture. Those technicians and veterinarians who pass the exam will earn the title of Certified Veterinary Pain Practitioner (CVPP).

This year’s exam will help set the pass point for those who wish to become certified in the future. The IVAPM is accepting applications for next year’s exam, which will take place in August 2010 at the CVC in Kansas City, Mo. Credentialed technicians and veterinarians interested in sitting for next year’s certification examination must submit their requests for an application by late fall, 2009. For more information, visit the IVAPM’s Web site at ivapm.org.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.