Team conflict for technicians | Firstline

Team conflict for technicians

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FIRSTLINE: Nov 24, 2014
By dvm360.com staff
Sometimes loyalty blocks the way for change.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2014
By dvm360.com staff
Use these helpful hints for navigating a minefield when you're caught in the middle.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2014
Use these checklists and advice to learn what motivates your team—and what gets their back up. Hint: You can copy these lists and leave them on your boss’s desk.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2014
Sheila Grosdidier counsels a team member battling low team morale.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2014
Halt the tattling—and hail good attitudes—with this simple trick.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2014
Q: What percentage of practices, large and small, would you say have the receptionist duties include taking the client into the exam room, pulling vaccines and filing and dispensing medications from the veterinarian at the end of the office visit? I feel it’s a lot of work for the front office team and takes them away from the phones and reception desk. The practice owner feels it would increase the payroll percentage too much for a technician to do.—Overworked
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2014
Face conflict head-on to build a stronger team.
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FIRSTLINE: Jun 05, 2014
Are you the bully at work? Take this quiz to find out if you need to make a change in your professional behaviors at your veterinary practice.
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FIRSTLINE: May 31, 2014
When your workplace bully becomes unbearable, strike back with these tips--before the situation gets grizzly. Check out these seven species of bullies—and tips to bear down.
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 01, 2014
By dvm360.com staff
Are you managing or micromanaging your veterinary team? Take this quiz to find out:
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2013
When opposite personalities collide, it can be difficult to see eye-to-eye. Look for fresh perspective on coworkers' differences to achieve harmony in your workplace.
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff
To prepare for a meeting with your veterinary team manager, write down your thoughts. State the problem in one or two sentences. Next, list two or three specific examples with approximate dates and times. Finally, offer a positive solution. "Fire Mary" isn't what most managers want to hear. Bosses want constructive steps that can help heal your team. Start your conversation with a request that respects your manager's time:
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2013
I love my job but our office manager is a big problem. She's very unprofessional and rude. She has given a tongue lashing to many clients and driven them away. I and my other team members suspect that she's stolen money, and we're sick of her attitude, the disrespect to others and her laziness. We confronted the owner about our concerns. He will have brief chats with her, but it only does good for a couple of hours. Help!
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff
How can you handle smartphones in your veterinary clinic? Plus, a poem to help employees remember to keep their phone away.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 27, 2013
Huddle up and go over the day's schedule at your veterinary hospital.