Team Center - Doctor Communication | Firstline

Team Center - Doctor Communication

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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
We rehired a team member after she had a baby and she's implemented a nursing regimen at work. At lunch, she nurses in her car with her undergarments visible or on the side lawn of the practice parking lot. Then she pumps—in our doctor's office. The rest of the staff is uncomfortable, and we would like to encourage discretion while still supporting her decision to nurse her child. How do I approach this employee?
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
You're the head technician at a flourishing practice. The hands-on owner is struggling to keep up with his rapidly expanding client base, and he often fails to delegate tasks to his team. Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member Sheila Grosdidier, BS, RVT, a partner with VMC Inc. in Evergreen, Colo., offers this script for addressing the owner, Dr. Committed
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2007
Before you punt the ball on your relationship with your boss, consider whether you can gain ground with a little coaching. Then tackle any sore spots with these six strategies.
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2007
You're the practice manager at a mid-sized clinic. When the stress index is high, one of the associates snaps at team members. Several team members have complained, and a few have threatened to quit. You're ready to discuss the problem with Dr. Sweet, the associate. Firstline Editorial Advisory Board member Pam Weakley offers this sample script:
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FIRSTLINE: Sep 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Our mixed animal practice is co-owned by one part-time and one full-time veterinarian. The part-time doctor handles the administrative duties, but she regularly arrives late and leaves early. The result: Our practice doesn't function smoothly and we're constantly operating in crisis mode. What can our team do?
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FIRSTLINE: Apr 30, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
When it's time to negotiate, don't be a doormat or a bully. Use these tips to find common ground.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2007
With six exam rooms, it could be difficult for the team at Nassau Veterinary Clinic in Nassau, N.Y., to keep track of which doctors are in each room.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2006
Feeling prickly about the new associate? You play a part in her success, so try to make her feel welcome.
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FIRSTLINE: Feb 01, 2006
Your veterinarian didn't go to school to learn to be a technician, receptionist, or practice manager, so don't let her act like one. Make her do her job--so you can do yours.
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FIRSTLINE: Oct 01, 2005
Favoritism, morale problems, unbearable associates–sometimes the doctor just doesn't see the issue. Use these strategies to clean off the doctor's rose-colored glasses, without making him or her mad.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
The practice owner won't invest in a piece of new equipment that I think we really need. How can I convince her to buy?
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2005
When you use the title your boss earned, you build respect for your team, increase your authority with clients, and lay the groundwork for a more professional workplace. And that's just for starters