Step 5: Cephalic catheter placement

Step 5: Cephalic catheter placement

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Feb 10, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
< Step 4 | Step 6 >     
veterinary
 

Advance the catheter into the place where you visualized or palpated the vein. Once you receive blood back into the hub of the catheter, slowly feed the catheter off the stylet and into the vein.

If you hit resistance, pull the catheter out of the vein and back onto the stylet. Ensure that blood is still backing up into the hub of the catheter. If it is, gently advance the catheter and stylet a little more into the vein and try again to feed the catheter into the vein.

If no blood is backing up into the hub, pull the catheter and stylet out until you see blood flow into the hub. Attempt to feed the catheter off the stylet again.

 

More in this package:
Introduction
Step 1: Clip the area
Step 2: Locate the cephalic vein
Step 3: Disinfect the area
Step 4: Insert the catheter
Step 5: Troubleshoot catheter placement
Step 6: See final catheter placement
Step 7: Place T-set adaptor
Step 8: See final T-set placement
Step 9: Tape catheter

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