Spring toxin 1: Tulips and hyacinths

Spring toxin 1: Tulips and hyacinths

While colorful flowers are easy on the eyes, they pose potential danger to cats and dogs. Teach your clients how to pet-proof their gardens with this information about six common spring plants and their toxicities.
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Spring toxin 1: Tulips and hyacinths
Tulips contain allergenic lactones, and hyacinths contain similar alkaloids. The toxic principle of these plants is concentrated in the bulbs, as opposed to the leaf or flower. Pet owners should prevent dogs from digging up, then eating these bulbs. When ingested, the bulbs can irritate the mouth and esophagus.

Typical signs of toxicity include profuse drooling, vomiting, and diarrhea depending. With large amounts of bulb ingestion, more severe symptoms, such as an increase in heart rate and changes in respiration, may be seen. These severe cases require immediate treatment.

There is no specific antidote for bulb ingestion. But pets' prognosis is good with the right veterinary care, including rinsing the mouth, giving anti-vomiting medication, and, possibly, administering subcutaneous fluids.

 
Next springtime toxin: Daffodils

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.