Receptionists: Calming patients starts with you

Receptionists: Calming patients starts with you

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Feb 01, 2011

Keeping animals in your clinic or hospital as calm and comfortable as possible should be the goal of the entire staff. This starts the second the animal walks through the door. Receptionists should quickly get the animal's information, offer a treat, and quickly move the patient's record to the person who places that animal into a room. The less time in the waiting area, the better. Treats are a great way to change the emotional state of an animal. If all of the rooms are filled, suggesting that owners take their pets for a walk outside might be helpful. Receptionists also can help by suggesting that the owners take their dogs to the car while checking out if there is more than one person present and the outside temperature allows.

Katie Costello, RVT, CPDT-KA, is co-owner of The Learning Dog Training and Enrichment Center in Hubbard, Ohio, and the founder of the therapy-animal group K-9's for Compassion. Costello is also a Society of Veterinary Behavior Technicians board member.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

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The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

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Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

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Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

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Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.