Quick tips to boost veterinary client compliance

Quick tips to boost veterinary client compliance

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Feb 01, 2012

Clients may not know what a fecal sample is, so don't be afraid to use the word "poop." Keep your communication simple and clear. You want your clients to understand you.

Asking the client to obtain the sample at home is easier on you and on the pet. When you obtain the sample at the clinic, it's easier on the client. Weigh the pros and cons before sending home a fecal collection container. If the owner is elderly or wheelchair-bound, for example, it may be better to try to obtain the sample during the pet's visit.

If you're sending home a fecal collection container, ask the owner to prepay for the fecal test. This greatly increases the chances the client will return a sample. It also makes it quick and easy to drop off the sample, and it guarantees you charge for the test.

Always label the fecal container before you put the fecal matter in it. After all, one jar of poop looks pretty much like the next. It's also wise to always document a client's refusal in the patient's medical chart when a pet owner declines fecal testing—or any other recommended test—for their pet.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.