Photo Gallery: A day at the JCU Veterinary Emergency Centre & Hospital

Photo Gallery: A day at the JCU Veterinary Emergency Centre & Hospital

Nov 01, 2013

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When Susan Logan, BS, CVT, visited Australia earlier this year, she not only found a great opportunity to volunteer with Dr. Caroline Mann. (Read more about Dr. Mann's work here.) Logan also visited the James Cook University Veterinary Emergency Centre and Hospital in Douglas, Queensland, which opened in January 2009, where she recorded a day in the life of the veterinary team.

Photos courtesy of Susan Logan

Logan, pictured here, holds a baby Australian possum. Click next to see more of her visit to a hospital Down Under.

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This is the surgery suite at JCU Veterinary Emergency Centre & Hospital.

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An Afghan hound patient is prepped for the surgical repair of a torn ligament.

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Solid waste “dunnies” were present in each room for those unexpected—and stinky!—surprises.

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Veterinary nurse Trudy Holt teaches a gentle restraint technique to JCU (James Cook University) veterinary students.

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The best organized and biggest veterinary laundry room in the southern hemisphere.

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The biggest autoclave I’ve ever seen!

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JCU veterinary students take notes at the viewing window during a tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy, or TPLO, on an Afghan hound.

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Veterinary surgeons prepare for surgery.

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Close-caption cameras allow JCU veterinary staff to observe critical patients from a computer in another room without disturbing the patient.

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Yes, you read this sign correctly. In northern Queensland, Australia, there is such a thing as a tick that can paralyze its host.

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The Down Under Dream Team of the JCU Veterinary Emergency Centre & Hospital, Head Veterinary Nurse Siew Ling Perkins, staff veterinarian Patricia Sturgeon and veterinary nurse and wildlife carer, Trudy Holt.

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Veterinary nurse Trudy Holt (who volunteers as a wildlife “carer” with North Queensland Wildlife Care Inc.) bottle feeds a young Australian possum that looks nothing like the common Virginia Opossum found in the United States. Each day Trudy brings her purse-of-possums to work with her at the JCU veterinary hospital. Each baby marsupial is held happily and securely in its own little bag. The bag made of cotton keeps the baby possum, bandicoot or wallaby warm (they are born both helpless and hairless) and feeling as secure as they might in their own mother’s pouch. When there is a neonate that is very young, it’s not unusual to find that one of the babies inside its pouch inside a wildlife carer’s shirt. As a former wildlife carer, I can attest that it’s a great way for both the baby and the human “mom” to keep warm on a cold day! Learn more here .

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Digital radiographs are taken …

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…and viewed post op on the TPLO Afghan hound.

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The TPLO Afghan hound’s post-operative radiographs look good, and he is carefully transferred to a cage in the treatment room for recovery.