Overcome team conflict in veterinary practice

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Aug 01, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
Bickering, gossip, game-playing: Besides being downright annoying, this type of coworker conflict can reduce a great veterinary practice to a disorganized heap of shoddy client and patient care. It’s time to stop the madness -- literally. This package gives you the data about conflict: how many veterinary practices suffer conflict, who's the cause, and what kinds of conflict you're likely up against. Check out the numbers, then get your complete guide to managing conflict here. (We'll give you that link again at the end,too.)

Data source: 2010 Firstline Team Trends Study

The complete package:
Is conflict among employees a problem in veterinary practices?
Is conflict between clients and employees a problem in veterinary practices?
What qualifies as conflict?
Who causes conflict?
Who do you argue with?
Have you ever done this?
Does gender play a role?
Stop playing the PMS card
One strategy you can try is to develop a code of ethics for handling conflict in the workplace. This should include a definition of what conflict actually entails. While some actions are clearly on the list -- yelling, pushing, and so on -- others you may need to think about. Is any disagreement a form of conflict? What about gossip? Get the general consensus from team members on the next page.

Data source: 2010 Firstline Team Trends Study

The complete package:
Is conflict among employees a problem in veterinary practices?
Is conflict between clients and employees a problem in veterinary practices?
What qualifies as conflict?
Who causes conflict?
Who do you argue with?
Have you ever done this?
Does gender play a role?
Stop playing the PMS card