Offer the best-care plan

Offer the best-care plan

Forget trying to guess what clients can afford. Instead, just tell them what's right for their pets.
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Apr 01, 2009

Forget trying to guess what clients can afford. Instead, just tell them what's right for their pets.


Pam Weakley
Your clients may be enjoying less disposable income than in the past. I know ours are. But that doesn't mean they won't dig deep for their pets' welfare. Over the years, pets have become more like family. Pet parents might have taken the annual vacation off this year's list, but pet care is probably still included in their must-have column.

The pets you care for deserve the best you have to offer. So always offer your Plan A first—you owe this to every single one of your patients and their owners. If clients falter or say they can't afford Plan A, then be willing to suggest a Plan B that will save them some money. Make sure the clients know the best possible results will come from Plan A, but you can still treat their pets with Plan B.

As you discuss recommendations with clients, gather all the facts about the care their pets need and the costs they can cover. Once you understand their circumstances, you'll be able to create a customized plan that meets clients' financial needs. For example, we recommend year-round heartworm prevention. However, if money is tight, we might recommend clients give a combination heartworm-and-flea preventive during the warm months and heartworm-only protection after the winter's first hard freeze.

Remember, you're the pet's advocate. If a client declines any type of wellness or preventive care, make a note on the patient record. Then ask the doctor or technician to tell the client how important these treatments are. Resist the urge to make the pet owner feel guilty for not following your recommendations. That's not your place. But it is your job to ensure each client is informed and can make educated decisions.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.