New positions keep the front desk organized

New positions keep the front desk organized

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Dec 01, 2005
By dvm360.com staff

Reorganizing staff members' responsibilities may help you better control your crowded reception area and improve client satisfaction. At least, that's what Jennifer Hoffman, hospital manager at Murrells Inlet Veterinary Hospital in Murrells Inlet, S.C., found.

"We had five front-desk staffers, and still, answering all the calls and keeping the reception area organized was a challenge," Hoffman says. So they created two new positions—a telephone receptionist who sits away from the front desk, and a client-care leader, who focuses on greeting clients and getting the visit started well.

"We also identify specific people to handle check-ins and others to help clients as they check out," Hoffman says. "The client-care leader points clients in the right direction and lets them know when the check-out staff has their charts and medications ready."

With these two new positions in place, clients no longer stand in line, and receptionists get uninterrupted one-on-one time with every client. "Our clients like this organized, calm reception area—and our average doctor transaction went up about $20," Hoffman says.

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