Microchips: What's your role in the veterinary practice?

Microchips: What's your role in the veterinary practice?

Help make sure you're spreading the microchip message and improve the chances lost pets will find their way home:
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Jun 01, 2013
By dvm360.com staff

Receptionist:

When pet owners call to schedule an appointment, ask if their pets are microchipped. When clients visit, offer them a handout, such as "FAQs about Microchipping" at http://dvm360.com/microFAQ.

Technicians and assistants:

When you're taking the pet's history, ask if Fluffy or Bowser ever strays from the house. You can use the sample script at http://dvm360.com/microscript to guide your conversation.

Practice manager:

Offer training at team meetings. Review how microchips can save the day at http://dvm360.com/microresist. Then learn how to market microchips with tips from http://dvm360.com/micromarket.

Veterinarian:

Reinforce the microchipping message by sharing success stories of pets reunited with their families. You may also share microchip statistics from http://dvm360.com/microstats.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

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A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

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An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

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Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.