"I dunno" isn't an answer

"I dunno" isn't an answer

Stop scrambling to find obscure objects.
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Mar 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

"There's nothing more frustrating to doctors than when they ask team members for something—an instrument, a drug, a handout—and the employees don't know where it is," says Donna Bauman, CVPM, practice manager at Ottawa Animal Hospital in Holland, Mich. "Of course, one person knows where to find it. But he or she is normally out that day."

To avoid this, Bauman compiled a list of hard-to-locate items and held a scavenger hunt. (Click here for a sample list.) When team members found an item, they'd rush to place it on the front desk where they could grab a goody—candy, pen, inexpensive gifts—and then continue playing.

"When all of the items on the list were found, we walked together around the practice and put things back to ensure everyone knew where the items lived—and what they were called and used for."

Bauman says since holding the scavenger hunt, doctors are happier and the patients receive better care because the staff doesn't waste time looking for objects.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

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The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

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A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

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Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

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Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.