How to stop fighting with your co-workers

How to stop fighting with your co-workers

When you and your team members just can't seem to get along, take a look at each others' style.
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Apr 02, 2009
By dvm360.com staff

Co-worker conflict is the top concern for veterinary team members, according to a 2008 Firstline survey. Why? Because it's tough to get along with people who aren't just like you. But it's even tougher to fight with them, because doing so makes everybody miserable, including clients and patients.

The solution is to take a look at how you and your team members like to communicate. For example, some people speak directly and get right to the point. Others prefer to start a discussion that gets the whole group talking rather than just one person.

The trick to making this work is figuring out which communication style you like and which your co-workers like. Luckily, Firstline Live at the CVC in Kansas City, Aug. 38-30, is here to help. Debbie Allaben Gair, CVPM, will walk attendees through a customized report that explains how they communicate and sheds light on why other team members walk and talk the way they do. Best yet: Registration is deeply discounted if you register before July 22.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

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The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

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A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

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A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

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An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

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Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.