6 ways to protect pets this summer - Firstline
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6 ways to protect pets this summer
Make sure this summer is a blast for your clients' families, cats and dogs included.

FIRSTLINE

Your veterinary clients might know the dangers of fireworks and hot weather. And they may be pros at hiding the grill scraps and glow sticks from their four-legged friends. But what about the other dangers that come with the summer? Here are six more things for clients to think about when celebrating this season, according to the Southeast Area Animal Control Authority (SEAACA).

  1. Prove it. Remind clients to confirm their pet's collar and I.D. information. Dogs and other pets can become easily frightened by loud celebrations on Independence Day. Make sure their pets are wearing properly fitted collars with correct identification and tags just in case they become scared and run away from home. Suggest clients consider microchipping, a great way to help guarantee pets will be returned home safely and promptly.

  2. Decorate wisely. Pets may easily mistake the red, white, and blue decorations for chew toys. Cats can even become tangled in streamers and ribbon. Encourage clients to pet-proof their homes and keep fun decorations out of a paw’s reach.

  3. Consider sedatives. The veterinarian might recommend that some your patients be sedated or tranquilized to better handle the fireworks noise and celebrations.

  4. Don’t ditch drinks. Alcoholic beverages have the potential to poison pets. Tell clients never to leave your beverages unattended. If alcohol is ingested, pets could become very intoxicated. They also could go into a coma—or worse.

  5. Put a leash on it. Never leave animals tethered or chained outside. Pets can injure or hang themselves if they jump around or leap over a fence while trying to run from the noises. Cats should stay indoors during loud celebrations.

  6. No parking. During hot weather, it’s always smart to reiterate that clients should never leave pets in parked cars. Partially opened windows on hot days do not provide sufficient airflow and also can put pets in jeopardy of being stolen.

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Source: FIRSTLINE,
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