Don't throw dogs a bone, FDA says

Don't throw dogs a bone, FDA says

It's no secret that dogs like to chew on bones. But do your clients know they can be deadly?
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Apr 27, 2010
By dvm360.com staff
It’s the oldest cliché in the book: Dogs love to chew on bones. But the FDA is warning that this time-honored tradition could be dangerous—and even deadly—for dogs.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones, like those from a ham or a roast,” says Dr. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery, or even death.”

Here are the biggest risks of giving dogs bones, according to the FDA:

> Broken teeth
> Mouth or tongue injuries
> Bone looped around dog’s lower jaw
> Bone stuck in dog’s esophagus, windpipe, stomach, or intestines
> Constipation due to bone fragments
> Severe bleeding from the rectum
> Peritonitis

The FDA has also released a client handout about the risks of bones. Click here to download the handout.

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