Could pet wellness plans save your practice?

Could pet wellness plans save your practice?

Pet owners want annual plans they can pay for monthly, but most veterinary practices aren't offering them. Are these plans just a fad—or are they the future of wellness care?
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Aug 01, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

Heading off disease. Managing conditions early. Catching subtle signs of trouble before symptoms become life-threatening. These are your hopes.

But clients must bring in their pets for these hopes to become reality. Unfortunately, that's happening less often. In fact, statistics show that people are getting more and more pets but fewer pets are visiting veterinary practices. One possible solution is an annual wellness plan that bundles services and allows clients to pay monthly fees toward this annual care.

People who own cats and dogs say they want these plans. But only one in 20 veterinary practices offers them.


More in this package:
Pet owners: We want monthly payments!
Monthly wellness plans? Not for most practices
Big benefit to the smallest pets
Keep your promotion subtle


Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.