Client conflict for technicians | Firstline

Client conflict for technicians

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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Six pet owners tell their stories about why they left veterinary practices. Learn from their experiences--then use these tips and tools to avoid critical client care mistakes.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
In calming an irate client, remember your tone and goal. Keep your tone normal when talking to the client and your body relaxed. Always remember that your goal should be to listen to their needs and try to meet them when appropriate.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2007
Is your practice easy to do business with? How can you achieve this goal? Here are some ideas.
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FIRSTLINE: Jul 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
When you're faced with savage clients, you need to know which ones you can tame and which ones to release back into the wild.
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FIRSTLINE: Jul 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Clients are waiting, dogs are barking, and phones are ringing. Sometimes you've got to tune out the static to offer clients the attention they crave and send them away happy.
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FIRSTLINE: Jun 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
There may be 50 ways to leave your lover, but it only takes one of these missteps to send clients packing.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2007
What you say--and what clients hear--may be worlds apart. When you're fishing for the right words to satisfy clients' questions, avoid these most misunderstood answers.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2006
Give the last clients of the day the same warm reception the 40 clients in front of them enjoyed.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: May 01, 2006
Difficult clients do your practice more harm than good by damaging team morale and causing conflict. Figure out who they are, and let them go.
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FIRSTLINE: Jun 01, 1999
Every practice loses some clients. Here's how to find out if your client losses add up to a drop in the bucket or a hemorrhaging wound to your client base--and how to staunch the flow of pet owners leaving your hospital.
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FIRSTLINE: Feb 01, 1999
You'll never avoid client conflicts completely, but you can face confrontations with less stress if you focus on finding the treasure in the tribulation.