Client conflict for technicians | Firstline

Client conflict for technicians

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FIRSTLINE: Mar 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Cats are the top pet, but dogs are the top patient.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 29, 2009
Learn how to read physical signals so you can hear what pet owners aren't saying.
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FIRSTLINE: Jan 01, 2009
Wish you could get inside clients' heads? You can by paying closer attention to their silent statements. Here's how.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2009
By dvm360.com staff
Controlling a frustrated eye roll is sometimes a daunting challenge for front-office staff.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 11, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Holding a steamy cup of java will help you warm up to difficult clients, a new study says.
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FIRSTLINE: Nov 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
I downloaded the free form "Pet Abandonment Letter" (September 2008) and wanted to stress the importance of following your state's laws regarding pet abandonment.
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FIRSTLINE: Aug 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
How to keep pet owners happy might seem like a mystery. But it's not. Learn the secrets to putting a smile on every client's face.
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FIRSTLINE: May 01, 2008
Q. How should we handle a client who seems obsessed with repeating diagnostic tests?
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FIRSTLINE: May 01, 2008
Why do clients pretend they gave medication, swear their pup stays on a leash, or claim their cat never goes outside?
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FIRSTLINE: May 01, 2008
By dvm360.com staff
Learn what to do when you suspect neglect.
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FIRSTLINE: May 01, 2008
Q. What do you do when clients say at checkout they want to pay later?
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Jan 01, 2008
They're the situations you dread.
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FIRSTLINE: Dec 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
Six pet owners tell their stories about why they left veterinary practices. Learn from their experiences--then use these tips and tools to avoid critical client care mistakes.
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DVM360 MAGAZINE: Nov 01, 2007
By dvm360.com staff
In calming an irate client, remember your tone and goal. Keep your tone normal when talking to the client and your body relaxed. Always remember that your goal should be to listen to their needs and try to meet them when appropriate.
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VETERINARY ECONOMICS: Nov 01, 2007
Is your practice easy to do business with? How can you achieve this goal? Here are some ideas.