Ask Amy: I work with grumps!

Ask Amy: I work with grumps!

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Aug 01, 2006
By dvm360.com staff



Q I'm frustrated with my team members' bad attitudes, and it's really bringing me down. What should I do?
—Feeling Blue

Dear Feeling Blue, When a group of people brings out the worst in each other it can be hard to identify the source of the toxins and prescribe the right antidote. Your best bet: Don't participate in the bad behavior. For example, if a colleague constantly crabs about a doctor, client, or co-worker, avoid these discussions. You can make nonthreatening comments, such as "I understand how you feel," say nothing at all, or speak up about what you think. For example, "I know Susan seems unfriendly, but I think she's really just shy. When you talk to her one-on-one, she really opens up." Sometimes positive comments will reverse some of the negativism. If there's a ringleader who's always stirring the pot, approach your boss privately and explain your concerns. On the other hand, if your boss generates some of the negative vibes, maybe it's time to beat a path to a practice with a healthier environment.
—Amy

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.