Are your good looks costing you?

Are your good looks costing you?

Women spend too much on cosmetics, study says.
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Aug 19, 2008
By dvm360.com staff

Showing up to work looking professional is important for veterinary team members. But are some women taking it too far? A new report from the nonprofit YWCA says that women may be risking their financial well-being in their quest to look good.

The report, called Beauty at Any Cost, says that U.S. women spend about $7 billion a year on cosmetics and beauty products. That's an average of $100 a month for every woman. If a woman saved and invested that money every month, after five years she'd have collected enough to pay for a year's worth of tuition and fees at an in-state public college, the report calculated.

Thinking about retirement? If you skip your monthly manicure and pedicure and put that $50 into your retirement account every month for 10 years, the report says you'll amass almost $10,000 in that time period.

The bottom line: Balance is key. It's OK to spend a little at the beauty counter as long as you save a little—and remember that your practice and patients value you regardless of whether you moisturized last night.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patient's lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.