6 ways to thank your veterinary team

6 ways to thank your veterinary team

Sometimes a simple thank you is enough. When a situation calls for a little more, you can try this quick list of ideas:
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Nov 11, 2011
By dvm360.com staff

1. Hold a client service meeting to celebrate your service successes and set new goals.

2. Plan a staff appreciation meal or day to celebrate your team.

3. For tech-savvy employees, send a “thank you” text that offers sincere praise, such as, “You were really phenomenal today. Thanks for the way you handled that dog.”

4. Buy pizza or bagels for your team to celebrate hard work on a stressful day.

5. Give team members or clients hand-written thank you cards to create a lasting impression. That way they can pull out the card and read it again when they’re having a bad day.

6. Offer additional educational opportunities to recognize a job well done. Consider sending team members to CVC in Washington, D.C. this April (head to thecvc.com for more info) or paying for online training to say thanks.

Remember praise isn’t just for good days. In fact, it's on the bad days that your kind words may mean the most. Click here to learn how to give better feedback and build a better team.

Proceedings papers for techs

The very best behavior advice for new puppy owners (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

The entire hospital staff should play a role in the counseling of new puppy owners.

The technician's role creating a behavior centered veterinary practice (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A focus on pet behavior in the veterinary clinic is an excellent practice builder.

Trying times--dealing with canine adolescent dog (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

A behavior wellness exam is an opportunity to check up on a pet’s behavioral health and answer any related questions a client may have.

Enriching geriatric patients' lives (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

An important time for practices to include a behavioral exam is when a pet becomes a senior.

Tubes and tracheas--all about endotracheal tubes and lesions in difficult intubations (Proceedings)

CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS

Endotracheal tubes are usually made from silicone, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic or red rubber.